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're using economic tools to address strategic challenges, for example, in afghanistan, because along with the security transition and political transition, we are supporting an economic transition that boosts the private sector and increases regional economic integration. it's a vision of transit and trade connections we call the new silk road. a related lever of power is development and we are helping developing countries grow their economies not just through traditional assistance but also through greater trade and investment, partnerships with the private sector, better governance and more participation from women. we think this is an investment in our own economic future and i love saying this because people are always quite surprised to hear it, seven of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are in africa. other countries are doing everything they can to help their companies win contracts and invest in emerging markets. other countries still are engaged in a very clear and relentless economic diplomacy. we should, too, and increasingly, we are. and make no mistake, there
will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but the two sides of that agreed. two seasons have been played without it. last weekend in new orleans, roger goodell was asked a number of questions including one on the issue of head injuries. here is more from last week. [video clip] >> i welcome the president's comments. we want to make sure people understand what we are doing to make our game safer, not just in the nfl but throughout sports. the changes we are making a in the nfl are changing all of sports. it is a better recognition of head injuries. of treat
are delighted to have david joining us this afternoon to talk about his new book catastrophic care how american healthcare killed my father and how to fix it. i think that there is -- when i think about health care i think of to challenges i think the conservatives have had on health care. the first is it tends to be little to criticize and critique the health care system because of the march and injured population and the response is than to say while the health care system is just fine. it's the best health care system the world. don't mess with it. don't change it. i think the second blind spot of conservatives in general the certainly in health care is the we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically or with charts and data and they are important, but a lot of times the way the liberals have one arguments is by talking about the single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her or the child is born with cystic fibrosis and the child cannot get health insurance. these are real challenges in the system. there are other challenges for p
in the u.s. capitol, and like all tourists, the very first thing i did when i came to washington, d.c. was to take a tour of the national mall. but when i got there i noticed something. if you just came to washington, d.c., and just went to the national, you almost believe african-americans never lived in the city. i went from one end of the mall to the other from the capitol all the way down to the lincoln memorial looking for the african-american history of washington, d.c.. and i could barely find anything. i said to myself that can't be true. i know there's african-american history in the city. it has to be african-american history of the national mall. maybe no one has bothered to sit and find out what it is and that's how this book came about. starting in the u.s. capitol, i needed my goal to find out what the african-american history of the national mall and this book is the result. i'm going to take a few minutes here today to talk about some of the things i discovered not only about the national mall, but about washington, d.c. as a city. some things i open interest you and
chrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his 34-year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much. thanks for coming out. i think this is a wonderful opportunity. the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. [laughter] for anyone who is, pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs, you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily, in our intelligence community, in many ways to meet the challenge of this new enemy. and more than anyone that i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping that evolution and developing the what i call the targeting engine which is what we have, i think, adopted as our primary method of defending the country. so thank you for being here, general mcchrystal. the great to see you. >> thanks, mark. thanks for a too-kind introduction. i always thought of you as a nonfiction writer, but you're free to g
for tighter gun control. >> america can do this. for us. please. >> the group mayors against illegal guns paid for this ad. it shows a clip from 1999 in which rifle association executive vice president says he supports background checks, and that's a different stance from recently. the ad is set to run here only in our area. >>> and weighing in on this photo, president obama shooting a shotgun. and the white house released it after the president was asked if he ever fired a gun, and the nra responded by saying one picture does not erase the support of every gun ban. >> one local guy trying to raise money after experiencing gun violence firsthand. the 25-year-old hosted a party last night in adams morgan. two years ago he survived a bullet to the back in what is believed a random attack for gang initiation. he has fully lovered. last night's fund-raiser helped to raise money to support gabrielle gifford and her push for tighter gun control. >> weather we address background checks or mental illness, and all of the problems need to be addressed in an open forum. >> it's something that we need to
by letting us on facebook at facebook.com/booktv or follow us on twitter @booktv. you can also visit our website, booktv.org, and click on news about books. you're watching c-span2, politics and public affairs weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. weeknights what's key public policy events in every weekend the lettuce nonfiction authors and books on book tv. you can see past programs and their schedules that our website at, and you could join in the conversation on social media sites. and now, taylor branch, author of the multi it volume of america in the king year's presents his thoughts on key moments in the civil rights movement. this is about an hour 15 spirited. >> thank you, mr. hale. thank you, atlanta. atlanta history center. i have been heretofore. and glad to be back. i am glad to be back talking about something that has been a subject that has been due to me my whole life and is inescapable now . i'm getting older, is my life's work a lamb glad for it. this is another round. i beg to take more questions tonight than i normally do. i am going to try to sell some
us. i'm laura evans. >> i'm maureen umeh. let's start with a look at the forecast. here is a look look outside. we are dealing with bone chilling temperatures and some remnants of snow. the winter woes are not over yet. more snow could be on the way. fox 5 gwen tolbart is in the weather center with the first look at the forecast. >> you are right, it's bone chilling outside. temperatures are going to rise but a little later in the week. we have to deal with manage longer as well as more snow. we have light snow activity stretching from hagerstown to leesburg and toward the i-70 crow door. it's a -- corridor. it's a little bit of that system that pushes its way in the last few days, a series of clippers actually. clouds are in full force. you can see once again we are getting a burst that will be heading through. we will get a bit of a break but then back to it once again as we head into the beginning of the week. we do have a winter weather advisory in effect as well as a winter storm watch for highland, allegany and pendleton in effect from monday to tuesday. temperatures right n
with steel. that's a carnegie kids. we used cars powered that will, it will rockefeller built them is the financial system and consuming is built on a system developed and created by people at pulitzer. pulitzer came to the united states and unearthing the soldiers and they went to europe and he didn't really see any action. like many veterans after the war he was on foot, often afterwards hard to integrate people into the economy. he ends up in st. louis greek becomes befriended by a major who becomes a senator from missouri this newspaper publisher. pulitzer enters the road. within five years of his dreamy night state companies elected state legislature to stare. it's that kind of speed of immigration 19th century when people would come in. to become successful in a really short in the story, in st. louis, inventing a new form of journalism. pulitzer is the modern-day surfer. if you go to a beach and look at on the water cannot be on with the waves are breaking the cnn in winning paddling was there for us, one of them paddles extraordinary speed and because they perceive the undu
churchill used to persuade world leaders to don't his position on various matters. it's about forty minutes. [inaudible conversations] good evening. thank you for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book "dinner with churchill: policy-making at the dinner table." since my book is all about the importance and dinners be assuredly not make you late for your own dinners. i will be brief. i want to whet your appetite so you'll buy my book. you want to -- i have lived with wrurnlg winston churchill for four years. it was wonderful. even though it took place in churchill college. i'm asked where i got the idea to add to the thousand already written. i have read many books about the man and notice many of the important accomplishments were achieved at dinners. sometimes at luncheons. so i began to wonder why that was so. why most of the deals that were struck at the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made at or facilitated by dinners at which the leaders were more relaxed in a formal session. so i began digging in to the churchill archives. not do
come in experiment of government, that all of us are in this together in a shrinking world, and in the long run and how we relate to korean communities in indonesia and communities and that is a strength for us. that bill was passed in 1965, and i guarantee you not one person in 100 who studies the civil rights movement understands that it is a third pillar, to build a structure that in the long run will be a great not only strength for america but a great inspiration. not because diversity is nice but because diversity is essential in the world that is shrinking. you have to learn how to get along with one another. we are unconscious to a lot of these things that are consequences of the freedoms set in motion by this movement that struggled for years like dr. king said, we're not there yet, we've got to take more risks, got to go to jail. and he finally ended segregation, gets the nobel prize analyst at said let's have chicken dinners on the nobel prize for 20 years and he said no, we've got to go. in the week is back in jail again. the mountaintop is nice but the valley c
. a in it mr. last discusses the population implosion in the u.s. and its impact on the economy culture and politics. this program lasts about an hour >> host: jonathan welcome. this is a very meaty book and there's a lot going on in here. the main thesis of course is the falling birthrate problem and what are the causes of those falling birthrates and the consequences. the rising individualism and and american lives in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to l
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12